Caller ID reformatting: Is it possible to add * symbol?

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by mamo, Sep 18, 2016.

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  1. mamo

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    On my mobile phone by default, my carrier had enabled a so called "comfort feature" wich consisted in a call-back function for busy lines. For me, it was very annoying. Thus I disabled it as soon as possible. What was interesting about it, was that it made smart use of the asterisk symbol.
    Lets say I called +49123456789 and the destination was busy. Later on, when the number was available again, I would get a call from *+49123456789 and if I answered it, this would equal a redial of the number I dialed in the first place.

    To sum up: Adding an asterisk symbol seems to be possible. Somehow.

    Now for the 3CX part:
    I want to setup call forwarding to mobile phones with the requirement that a) the original caller ID should be displayed and b) you should be able to tell whether someone called you directly via your mobile number or the call was forwarded via 3CX.

    Thanks to working Clip no screening feature point a) is now working. 8)
    What I am now struggling with is point b). With Caller ID Reformatting, I was able to manipulate the number to some extent. For example, I successfully tried to add some digits. However the result looks rather ugly. What came to my mind now, was the incident with the * symbol described above. Just adding a * in front of the number of every forwarded call would be really neat. Question is: Is this even theoretically possible. And if so: How?

    I tried with (.*) as source and *\1 as replace pattern, but this didn't work. (Result was my own number instead of original caller ID being displayed)
     
  2. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

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    Someone else may have an answer. I tried once to do that years ago, but it wasn't successful. What will work, in North American , is to substitute "11" in place of the *. This works for short dial codes, to allow rotary dial phones to use features that have the * as a prefix. So... per call number blocking, which is normally *67, becomes 1167, with both a rotary set, and also works with DTMF.

    I don't know if your provider will allow the same thing, but it can't hurt to try.
     
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