High Temp Capable ATA

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by lneblett, Aug 16, 2013.

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  1. lneblett

    lneblett Well-Known Member

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    I have a need for an FXS ATA that can withstand relatively high ambient temperature ranges. The issue I face is a need to accommodate analog auto-dialers that relay pre-recorded voice announcements. The dialers are located in remote outdoor, weatherproof enclosures (NEMA4 or IP55) and there are no nearby structures that offer any relief or ability of being able to locate the ATA. The ATAs will need to be located in similar cabinetry, but if I cannot find a more suitable model, likely in NEMA-3R rated encloures with air exchange capability in order to keep the ambient temperatures manageable.

    The dialer equipment is rated for 140F, whereas most of the ATAs I have been able to source are rated from 104F or 113F. I have seen a couple from companies based in India and S. Korea that report 122F capability, but I seek something even higher if available.

    I am hoping that some on the forum might know of a make/model that is more robust.
     
  2. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

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    An ATA is not the sort of item that one expects to find in a "ruggedized", or a Mil spec version. Not to say that they arn't out there somewhere, Most of the components, circuit board, solder , etc. are going to be pretty common to all standard units available, and will function in the same "general" temperature range.

    What can generate heat, and therefore requires cooling, is any sort of voltage converter/regulator. This could be moved off the main circuit board and a higher capacity version, mounted to a large heat-sink that could be made to have an external extension, allowing greater cooling.

    Common sense design such as mounting on the shady side, colour of the enclosure, or even adding some small solar powered fans will help.

    Good luck in your search, post back if you are able to come up with something.
     
  3. lneblett

    lneblett Well-Known Member

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    Leejor-

    Thanks, all good points. I am only pursuing this as a one-off project and did not have high hopes, but i thought that perhaps some of our non-US forum folks might have some added insight. I have considered how to accommodate the ambient, radiant and generated heat issues from a number of angles, but am afraid that my location (deep south Texas, next to Mexico) precludes a cost effective and reliable solution. Nothing like having to house a ATA in an enclosure whose costs is likely 10x that of the device itself....not to mention the maintenance issues associated to filter cleaning, fan replacement, thermostats, condensation, etc.

    i even looked for board level possibilities, but as you suggested it seems that the reference designs all point to non-industrial use. I thought there might be some obscure industrial/factory style ATA around given that analog phones are still highly in use in those environments. i was reasonably sure a mil-spec ATA was a even more remote prospect.

    but...hey, you never know till you ask.

    thanks again.
     
  4. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

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    If I were doing it...

    I'd go for something reliable, but low cost. If you have some to test, you, you might find that some ATA's do not heat-up as much as others. I notice that SPA-2102s get fairly warm and have vent holes to deal with that, but I recall some older Grandstream units with no vent holes and not a lot of heat either.

    Open it up and run it for a while, check to see which components get warm, A non-contact thermometer is handy for this.

    If possible move the heat generating components off the board, hopefully just power components If the main IC heats up, attach a big heatsink.

    Seal the rest of the board in Silicone (after you have extended all wires), to protect against humidity/corrosion, with a heatsink protruding if necessary.

    Protect the sunny side of the mounting box with a thermally isolated, reflective "piece of shade". here is no point in the direct sun heating up the "box" more than just the ambient temperature.

    Silicone devices can handle a lot of heat, check the temperature of some CPU's even with a good heatsink.

    Hope for the best.
     
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