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How do 3CX eliminate wiring phone networks?

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by rjtan, Jul 8, 2014.

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  1. rjtan

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    Could anybody explain how do 3CX eliminate wiring phone networks? Coz i'ved read it in the site. Thanks a lot!
     
  2. lneblett

    lneblett Well-Known Member

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    Using a traditional PBX or even that wiring for standard PTSN phones (such as at a home), one would normally wire using a 4 conductor cable (also called Cat3). The PTSN analog phones only require 2 conductors, but most PBXs require more. This form of communication is different from that of a computer network and is therefore not capable of being put onto the same cable. Further, if using a PBX, it may have its own proprietary requirements that forces the use of other wiring. Phone cabling has been in use since the day before water was invented and certainly before the advent of computers and today's networking schemes.

    In most cases, it is assumed that businesses will have a need to accommodate wiring suitable for both telephones and computers, but with a VoIP or IP-PBX system such as 3CX, you can use the (computer) Ethernet network (8 conductor) wiring to accommodate both needs as the IP-Phones and/or adapters are all made to work with Ethernet.

    The analog voice is digitized by the IP-Phone/Adapter and put into data packets and sent/received onto the network cabling no differently than that of a computer. Many of the phones/adapters have a built-in Ethernet switch such that from the wall you cable into the Phone/Adapter and then from the Phone/Adapter to the computer. This fundamentally allows one cable or port to feed both the phone and the computer.

    It is the above that generally allows one to wire with Ethernet and not have to worry about separate wiring for the phones. Of course, there is nothing, other than expense, that prevents you from wiring for both the telephone and computer with Ethernet cabling as the phones only require a limited number of conductors. But you will be paying a premium for the added conductors.

    Finally, for most small to midsize businesses, a single cable installation is fine. However for larger or Enterprise businesses the need or desire to keep the telephone and data networks separate may emerge. What determines the need is mostly attributable to how many users and how much data will be traversing the network at anyone time and whether or not the bandwidth is sufficient to accommodate all the needs without fear of impeding voice (telephone) traffic. Some folks like to keep the voice separate from data so that it may ease troubleshooting and well as permanently avoid the other issue. If the business is a moderate user of the internet and internal file transfers and the like, then a single cable is likely adequate, but if they do large file transfers like video or cad/cam files, etc., they will need to look at the usage and plan accordingly...which may mean separate networks.
     
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