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internal dialing rules

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by ClayGoss, May 8, 2015.

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  1. ClayGoss

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    I am implementing a 3cx for 11 locations. I have worked out an extension numbering scheme of 1 <2 digit location> <2 digit extension>. I hate to see everyone having to dial 5 digits all the time, so I wanted to create rules to allow dialing 101 for estensign 1 at location 1.

    How can I do this?
     
  2. jasit

    jasit New Member

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    if you have 11 locations, then I would use four digit dialing for all staff.

    so location one extensions are 2200 -2299
    location 2 2300-2399 or 5100-5500


    if you do that, then you don't have to worry about people having to figure out the rules to dial other sites extension numbers. if you put peoples extension number on their business cards then it works at all locations by making everyones extension unique.

    your outbound rules are extemely easy to setup then and all locations have the same oubound rules.

    jasit
     
  3. ClayGoss

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    Thank you for the reply. Four digits does not work for 11 locations. It takes 5.

    But numbering schemes aside, it doesn't answer my question.
     
  4. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

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    Outbound rules are just that...rules for outbound calls. You can't use them to route internally. If you are using Bridge trunks between locations, then that is considered an outgoing call.

    You could use a loop trunk, send the call out, then back in, but that will use two licences for each internal call (I believe), not really practical. I can dig up the info for setting that up, if you are really interested.


    Have a look at this, on creating "speed dial" rules. Keep in mind that, obviously, you can't use any number that is in conflict with a local extension number, as a dialled number would route to the extension before reaching the rules.

    http://www.3cx.com/blog/voip-howto/speed-dials-using-3cx-outbound-rules/

    Some VoIP sets, and ATAs, have internal dial-plans, and can be configured to do digit substitution. So, dialling , say, 134, could be sent to the PBX as 2234. But, all of that would require you having compatible sets.

    Depending on how many phones you have at each location, less than 100, you could still get away with a four digit system.

    You could also have 3 digits internally, and only require more, when calling outside, to another office.
     
  5. ClayGoss

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    Again, thank you for the reply. First, this company is growing and soon will be over 100 extentions. Four digit extentions are not an option. Besides, they're all setup and I don't plan on tearing them out and putting them back. For now, we'll have to dial five digits.

    I saw another post with a link for making feature suggestions. Does anyone have that?
     
  6. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

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    Here ya go...

    http://www.3cx.com/ideas/index.php

    Unfortunately, when you are dealing with a number of locations, with a lot of extensions, you have to bite-the-bullet and go to longer extension numbers, if you want to keep the dialling plan, from office to office, consistent.

    With four digits, the maximum you could possibly have is 10000 numbers. However, access prefixes, and other special number combinations, can reduce this substantially.

    In a way, it is no different than areas of North America where it is now necessary to dial ten digit numbers (and a lot of us have become used to that) ,rather than the previous seven. Increased demand for numbers requires more area codes in smaller geographic areas.
     
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