Maintaining Communications

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by starla, Oct 13, 2009.

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  1. starla

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    Hi All,

    I am planning to setup an IP PBX that relies primarily on a SIP trunk to an ITSP with a range of DDI's. My fear is that one day, my internet connection will fail and I will stop receiving inbound calls on those numbers. Sure I can use a PSTN VOIP gateway to place outbound calls but that doesn't help my customers trying to dial in.

    I am interested to learn how people out in the real world are overcoming these issues. I know that even the PSTN cannot be 100% resilient but I want to provide the best availability I can with as much fail over automation as possible

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts guys!!
     
  2. igor.snezhko

    igor.snezhko Active Member

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    Heh! Virtually all can fail, including a somebody's life :cry:

    This this is not a reason to fear VoIP. Anyway, you can study this http://www.voip-info.org/wiki/view/Asterisk+High+Availability+Solutions
     
  3. starla

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    Hey Igor, aint that the truth.

    Thanks for the info but I was thinking more on the service side rather than multiple Server Hardware which most of those Howto are aimed at (good read nevertheless)

    My existing ITSP does not require me to login and instead forwards all sip calls to my Static IP address (which wont exist if my connections fails). Obviously selecting an ITSP which requires trunk registration/authentication would be a work around, if my connection fails I could use some form of backup/ISDN connection to the internet and re-register with a different address.
    Maybe using DYNDNS address instead of a static ip would work with my existing provider and backup line? I guess there are lots of solutions but I am quite new to this and was interested to learn how other users/admins have solved similar situations.

    Thanks once again Igor.
     
  4. KerryG

    KerryG Active Member

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    If you want to provide the best quality and highest reliability than stick with traditional circuits. PRI circuits and then analog circuits are far more reliable than internet connections. I prefer to stick with using SIP trunks as capacity overflow rather than primary circuits. The exception to this is if you are getting the SIP trunk from your circuit provider with hybrid services from companies like CBeyond, XO, Paetech, and Telepacific.
     
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  5. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

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    As devices become more complicated there is more of a chance of failure, no matter what it is...If you want to know how companies deal with the possibility of their telecommunication system failing then perhaps a hospital would be a good place to look for solutions, or a government agency, something mission critical.

    Obviously a backup is the best answer when possible but you have to take into consideration the odds of a failure and how much you are willing to spend to cover those odds. If your internet connection goes down on a regular basis and you can't afford to have any downtime AND you want to go with a VoIP provider then... Go with a provider that is NOT your ISP, have some numbers from a second VoIP provider, bring a second high speed connection in to your business (one on cable the other DSL) as a backup. Have a second PC with 3CX ready to boot up go in the event the first one fails.

    You can only do so much, it comes down to "what are the odds it will fail" and $$$$$$
     
  6. KerryG

    KerryG Active Member

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    I always have to ask why is the requirement to use VoIP circuits? To save a few cents per minute? If you have to spends thousands of dollars on multiple circuits, custom routes, higher end routers, multiple servers, etc, etc, isnt any cost savings of using a SIP provider a complete loss then?

    I NEVER sell an IP PBX system as a way of saving on call costs, its about productivity, features, remote users, desktop applications, growth, expandability, more affordable management, those are the things that sell phone systems, not saving a few cents per minute on calls.
     
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