ring both phone and cell at same time but...

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by lneblett, Feb 16, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. lneblett

    lneblett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    2,083
    Likes Received:
    61
    Rings are not really measured by the number of rings, but rather by the amount of time you need. As more and more people are customizing ring tones, there are many that have a continuous pattern and as a result it is not really possible to identify a number.

    I suspect that once the system has dialed the cell phone (during which time it is ringing both), the cell carrier has assumed control of that leg of the call and effectively provided an answer response to 3CX. It is a timing and a response issue over which 3CX has no control.

    If you will look at the extension settings under forwarding rules, you will see how long the ring will occur given the extension's status before it will invoke the next rule of where to go. If you really want it to ring longer internally, then set the extension up to ring the desired amount of time and if not answered within the time to forward to your cell. You can also set up the ring in your current set-up for a longer period and test to see if any difference is noticed
     
  2. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    Messages:
    10,737
    Likes Received:
    278
    What type of trunking are you using to send the call to your mobile? If it is a PSTN gateway , and not VoIP, then the call to the mobile, may be considered answered, after the digits are passed to the PSTN line.
     
  3. craigreilly

    craigreilly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3,304
    Likes Received:
    249
    ...and how is the call to the Cell being made - Gateway to Analog,T1,E1, etc or VoIP ?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  4. craigreilly

    craigreilly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3,304
    Likes Received:
    249
    So they are analog lines?
    If so - then there are some settings that might work - but not guaranteed. There is a Battery Reversal setting that could help.
    I would contact Grand-stream to see if they can help you out on not "accepting the call" right away from 3cx.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. craigreilly

    craigreilly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3,304
    Likes Received:
    249
    It may have the same issue if the Comcast line does not support it.
    I had a 4940 on a T1 and the line did not support it.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  6. lneblett

    lneblett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    2,083
    Likes Received:
    61
    Craig -

    Battery reversal is pretty much a dead feature in the US PSTN market. It was used to detect a subscriber hang-up. The current CPC feature uses an open for a certain time (200-500 ms and may be programmable to less/more) to signal a hang-up. The battery reversal simply changes polarity for a similar time to effect the same hang-up. I am not certain how this setting comes into play for the scenario given. It is however still supported in a number of gateway VoIP style devices as there are some countries that still use it.

    The provider will have to support it, and the GS device has an auto FXO set-up so as to optimize the device to the line. The Patton will most likely not offer relief as it is doubtful that the eMTA supports it. The GS device I do not think supports reversal whereas the Patton does, but again, as you pointed out, the provider has to support it.

    The audio issue is something else entirely and was not a part of the original post. If one calls the cell directly, does audio pass then?
     
  7. leejor

    leejor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2008
    Messages:
    10,737
    Likes Received:
    278
    While CPC is a much more common feature, current reversal is still used, and available, for many services. When used, the reversal comes when the called party goes off-hook (answer supervision), and will usually reverse again, when they hang up. Now-a-days it is usually limited to certain type line-cards in class 5 switches and is therefore a requested option (billable) for business lines that require it, or, in most cases, coin phones. Some ATA's will provide the feature, and some gateways will support it, if the features are configured correctly (turned on). If current reversal is provided, it does not mean that CPC cannot also be provided on the line. they are not necessarily exclusive.

    For example, if you receive a call, you won't necessarily have a current reversal, but may require CPC to cause the line to drop.
     
  8. lneblett

    lneblett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    2,083
    Likes Received:
    61
    Leejor, not disagreeing with you, just simply stating that BR is not widely used in the US. I believe it to be even more so since the FCC has mandated that telephone equipment operate correctly regardless of polarity.

    Coin phones, remember ground start? But even now, pay phones are becoming a thing of the past.

    The function is still supported by others as I mention in the case of the Patton & other countries. I just don't think it to be as prevalent today as it was and I think it is growing smaller as times go by. I may have been overzealous by stating "pretty much dead", but I doubt that few in the USA using an analog gateway will be using BR and even more so when using an eMTA for voice from a cable provider.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.