Windows OS for 3CX

Discussion in '3CX Phone System - General' started by aspiq, Jul 17, 2010.

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  1. aspiq

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    Hi

    Is Windows 7 Ok for this type of installation on a Work station with Intel Core2, 2Gb Ram, 320 GB Hard disk

    3CXPSENT Enterprise Edition 32SC
    and for
    3CXPSENT64 Enterprise Edition 64SC

    Can call recording be on the same machine or will moving it to on another machine on the lan enhance performance
     
  2. carolinainnovative

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    Windows 7 should be sufficient, as should that machine.

    Call recording happens on the 3cx machine and will depend on how much recording you want to do... but for moderate recording, you should still be just fine.
     
  3. aspiq

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    Hi,

    Thank you for the reply, clarifying the doubt that we had

    For a call center application the Call recording would be always on for all the 30 / 6o chanels of the PRI

    Would it still be considered moderate.

    Is it a must that the call recording must and should happen on the same 3CX machine. Can it not be moved to anothe dedicated machine for this job

    Would enhancing the hard disk speed or increasing the ram or processor speed mitigate any issues wrt the call recording

    Once again thanking you for the reply
     
  4. StefanW

    StefanW Head of Customer Support and Training
    Staff Member 3CX Support

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    lets put it this way. REC need CPU and RAM.
    AS more sim. REC more you need.
    I see at first that the disc space will run out quick on 320GB by 30 or 60 sim. calls.
    What you can do is save the rec to a different location path.
    So you can mount a network drive and place the rec. there. Even very good to make it this way, coz when you have to make a backup/restore you dont whant to backup all the 320GB for Vbox messages. It will take for ages or you will lose them.
    So make use of this first!

    The Rec. will go into a buffer on the host. After the buffer is full we write the wav. file and will increment it when buffer is full again. So RAM is the second point you have to increase more then 2GB. Modern motherboards can run easy up to 8GB of RAM and 4x 2GB Moduls are cheap this days. With a modern i5 CPU u will be fine running this work.

    A singel disc this days have good writing speed but the access time is also at this level a point. Slow spinning 5400rpm discs are nto good for this job. may see some WD Raptors as a buged solutions in a RAID (Attention to the Raid Level. Raid 5 is one of the worst writers but best readers, Strip is high risk and mirror no risk but no perf...)

    To save maybe disc space on the host that just will contain the rec. you may install a hot folder wav to mp3 converter.
    We write there wav and when the tool goes at night and works it all down to mp3... Never tested this but may work... http://www.wav-mp3.com/
     
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  5. sigma1

    sigma1 Active Member

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    Assuming that you will be using a newer system, I would consider putting 2 500GB SATA 3G drives in Raid0 mode and spend some money on the CPU power, Recording is processor intensive. I also suggest you use 4GB of RAM on a 64bit OS.
     
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  6. carolinainnovative

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    And if the raid array has a hiccup you're screwed.
     
  7. mylove4life

    mylove4life New Member

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    I agree... never use RAID 0... spend the money on 2- 2 TB drives in a RAID 1
     
  8. StefanW

    StefanW Head of Customer Support and Training
    Staff Member 3CX Support

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    as i said before

    Raid 0 ++ Performance --Risk
    Raid 1 00 Performance ++Risk
    Raid 5 ++ Read --Write ++Risk
    Raid 6 ++ Read 00 Write ++Risk
    Raid 10 ++ Read ++ Write ++Risk (high wast of space min 4 Disks)
    Raid 50 ++ Read ++Write ++Risk (high wast of space min 6 Disks)

    ++ Good
    -- Bad
    00 Even
     
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  9. sigma1

    sigma1 Active Member

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    Hey salter cool your horses.

    With over 200 front end servers in our data centers, we had ZERO failures and they are all on raid 0 (1u cases, 2 drives max). If you get a quality drive (hint.... avoid seagate) you should be OK. If you can splurge for 2 more drives, Raid 10 is the way to go. Just make sure that no matter what, you have a FAST bare metal restore strategy in place.

    If you go RAID 0 I suggest you use SATA drives in caddies so that you can swap them quickly. If you TRULY want to be on top of your game, make sure your motherboard supports 6 SATA drives and use 4 drives in Raid 10, install a 5th drive on channel 5 NOT PART OF THE RAID and once you are all set with your setup, do a bare metal backup image on the 5th drive. In case disaster strikes, have the system boot from the CD/DVD and restore the image from drive 5 extremely fast.

    It is all a matter of how much you want to spend. The ideal setup for me is still 32GB SSD boot drive and APP+ RECORDS on RAID 0 on 2 SATA 3G drives. Everybody has their opinion. Your budget dictates the path.
     
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  10. carolinainnovative

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    Pardon?

    You do what you want - but my statement is still true. The fact that you have all that working on raid 0 is lovely - bully for you - but one bad drive takes the entire array with it. That is a fact. Good hardware doesn't change said fact, REGARDLESS of how few problems you may have had.
     
  11. sigma1

    sigma1 Active Member

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    Sure, and one bad motherboard takes the system down, so does a bad CPU, so does a bad power supply. There is a reason Raid 0 exists. Restoring a Raid 0 array with the average 10GB of data takes less than 10 minutes on a decent system. replacing a bad motherboard is more downtime. I will not argue the merit of the fact that a Raid 0 will cause downtime if a drive fails and you must agree that there are many other single points of failure on a system. Perhaps we see things differently because I have been a data center infrastructure engineer for almost 15 years with large data centers. The fact remains that drives today are far more reliable and cheaper so it would be a smart choice to have at least a spare drive and install them in caddies. Restore time... 10-12 minutes. and very unlikely...

    How long does it take to rebuild a Raid 5 array? I am sure more than 10-12 minutes. No matter what Raid configuration you select, there is no excuse not to have a backup (or CDP). I look at at this as total downtime and not as hands off easy rebuild.
     
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  12. carolinainnovative

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    True - mobo's take down the system as well, but in the last 10 years I've been in business and the 5 prior I worked in the industry - I've had maybe three motherboards die - and most of those were on laptops. The ones that weren't laptops were desktops on which I'd never even consider running a business phone system. I've also had a few power supplies go out. HOWEVER - I've seen COUNTLESS hard drives fail - both in servers and workstations. Even with good HDs, they are by far the weakest link in the chain - in my experience.

    But again - your mileage may vary, and you do what you want. I will still recommend against it anytime anyone asks here or elsewhere.
     
  13. sigma1

    sigma1 Active Member

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    I wanted to let this thread die because I felt that it was going nowhere, but i'd like to add this:

    In our experience, no matter what raid you use or not use, you need to make sure that you case has proper ventilation/cooling. Often, hard drive failures are due to high temperature so AVOID THEM. If you want to make sure that your case flows enough air by your drive/drives, install a simple utility like SIW and sheck the temeprature senor readings. It is a good idea to keep the hard drives at less than 90 degrees.
    We just decomissioned today one of the longest in service raid here and the drives were Maxtor PATA 133 200GB. RIAD5(2005). This was a temporary backup vault so it worked hard. Never lost a drive in it. Data center is at 65 degrees.
     
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  14. carolinainnovative

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    On that we can agree - high temps kill hard drives faster than anything else... and thats good re your recent decommission. I won't even run raid 0 on a backup in our data center - due to a failure we had in our backup storage array - in a 65 degree data center. I've been burned - bad. But again - your mileage may (and apparently has) vary(ied).
     
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